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[Act No. 56 of 1951]

[23rd October, 1951]

PREAMBLE

An Act to provide against the printing and publication of incitement to crime and other objectionable matter.

BE it enacted by Parliament as follows:–

Chapter I – PRELIMINARY

Section 1 – Short title, extent and commencement

(1) This Act may be called the Press (Objectionable Matter) Act, 1951.

(2) It extends to the whole of India except the State of Jammu and Kashmir.

(3) It shall come into force on such date as the Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, appoint and shall remain in force for a period of two years from the date of its commencement.

Section 2 – Definitions

In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires,–

(a) “book” includes every volume, part or division of a volume, pamphlet and leaflet, in any language, and every sheet of music, map, chart or plan separately printed, lithographed or otherwise mechanically produced;

(b) “Code” means the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898 (Act V of 1898);

(c) “competent authority” means any officer empowered in this behalf by a general or special order of the State Government;

(d) “document” includes also any painting, drawing or photograph or other visible representation;

(e) “newspaper” means any periodical work containing public news or comments on public news;

(f) “news-sheet” means any document other than a newspaper containing public news or comments on public news;

(g) “press” means a printing press, and includes all plant machinery, duplicators, types, implements and other materials used for the purpose of, or in connection with, printing or multiplying documents;

(h) “Press Registration Act” means the Press and Registration of Books Act, 1867 (XXV of 1867);

(i) “Sessions Judge”, in relation to the presidency town of Calcutta or of Madras, means the Chief Presidency Magistrate;

(j) “unauthorised newspaper” means–

(i) any newspaper in respect of which security has been required under this Act but has not been furnished as required, or

(ii) any newspaper which is published without conforming to the rules laid down in section 5 of the Press Registration Act;

(k) “unauthorised news-sheet” means any news-sheet in respect of which security has been required under this Act but has not been furnished as required;

(l) “undeclared press” means any press other than a press in respect of which there is for the time being a valid declaration under section 4 of the Press Registration Act.

Section 3 – Objectionable matter defined

In this Act, the expression “objectionable matter” means any words, signs or visible representations which are likely to–

(i) incite or encourage any person to resort to violence or sabotage for the purpose of overthrowing or undermining the Government established by law in India or in any State thereof or its authority in any area; or

(ii) incite or encourage any person to commit murder, sabotage or any offence involving violence; or

(iii) incite or encourage any person to interfere with the supply and distribution of food or other essential commodities or with essential services; or

(iv) seduce any member of any of the armed forces of the Union or of the police forces from his allegiance of his duty, or prejudice the recruiting of persons to serve in any such force or prejudice the discipline of any such force; or

(v) promote feelings of enmity or hatred between different sections of the people of India;

or which–

(vi) are grossly indecent, or are scurrilous or obscene or intended for blackmail.

Explanation I.– Comments expressing disapprobation or criticism of any law or of any policy or administrative action of the Government with a view to obtain its alteration or redress by lawful means, and words pointing out, with a view to their removal, matters which are producing, or have a tendency to produce, feelings of enmity or hatred between different sections of the people of India, shall not be deemed to be objectionable matter within the meaning of this section.

Explanation II.– In judging whether any matter is objectionable matter under this Act, the effect of the words, signs or visible representations, and not the intention of the keeper of the press or the publisher of the newspaper or news-sheet, as the case may be, shall be taken into account.

Explanation III.– “Sabotage” means the doing of damage to plant or stocks, or to bridges, roads and the like with intent to destroy or injuriously to affect the utility of any plant or service or means of communication.

Chapter II – PRINTING AND PUBLICATION OF OBJECTIONABLE MATTER

Section 4 – Power to demand security from presses in certain cases

Whenever upon complaint made to him in writing by the competent authority and inquiry made in the mariner hereinafter provided, a Sessions Judge is satisfied–

(a) that any press kept within the local limits of his jurisdiction is used for the purpose of printing or publishing any newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document containing objectionable matter, and

(b) that there are sufficient grounds for demanding security from the keeper of the press under this section, the Sessions Judge shall, by order in writing, direct the keeper of the press to deposit as security within twenty-one days from the date of the order, such amount as the Sessions Judge may think fit to require in money or the equivalent thereof in Government securities as the person making the deposit may choose:

Provided that if, having regard to all the circumstances, the Sessions Judge is satisfied that the requirements of the ease will be met by a warning, he may, instead of demanding security, record such warning.

Section 5 – Power to forfeit security or demand further security

Whenever upon complaint made to him in writing by the competent authority and inquiry made in the manner hereinafter provided, the Sessions Judge is satisfied–

(a) that any press in respect of which any security has been ordered to be deposited under section 4 or under this section is thereafter used for the purpose of printing or publishing any newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document containing objectionable matter, and

(b) that there are sufficient grounds for making an order under this section, the Sessions Judge shall, by order in writing,–

(i) declare such security as has been deposited or any portion thereof to be forfeited to the Government, or

(ii) direct the keeper of the press to deposit, within twenty-one days from the date of the order, such further security as the Sessions Judge may deem fit to require, and may also, in either case, declare all copies of the newspaper news-sheet, book or other document containing such objectionable matter, wherever found in India, to be forfeited to the Government.

Section 6 – Consequences of failure to deposit security as required under section 4 or section 5

(1) Where the keeper of a press is required under section 4 or section 5 to deposit any amount as security and the deposit is not made within the time allowed,–

(a) the declaration mad by the keeper of the press under the Press Registration Act shall be deemed to be annulled;

(b) notwithstanding anything contained in the Press Registration Act, neither the said keeper of the press nor any other person shall make, or be allowed to make, a fresh declaration before a Magistrate under that Act in respect of the press unless he deposits with the Magistrate as security the same amount as was required of the keeper of the press under section 4 or section 5, as the case may be in money or the equivalent thereof in Government securities as the person making the deposit may choose; and

(c) the press shall not be used for the printing or publishing of any newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document until the deposit has been made.

(2) Where any press is used in contravention of clause (c) of sub-section (1), any Magistrate may, on a complaint in writing made to him in this behalf by the competent authority, direct the keeper of the press to show cause why it should not be forfeited to Government, and, after hearing him and on being satisfied that there are grounds for passing the order, declare the press or any part thereof to be forfeited to the Government:

Provided that the press or part thereof so forfeited shall not be disposed of within a period of three months from the date of the order of forfeiture, and if the keeper of the press deposits the required amount within the aforesaid period, the press or part thereof, as the case may be, shall be returned to the keeper of the press.

Section 7 – Power to demand security from newspapers and news-sheets in certain cases

Whenever upon complaint made to him in writing by the competent authority and inquiry made in the manner hereinafter provided, a Sessions Judge is satisfied–

(a) that a newspaper or news-sheet published within the local limits of his jurisdiction contains any objectionable matter, and

(b) that there are sufficient grounds for demanding security from the publisher of the newspaper or news-sheet under this section, the Sessions Judge shall, by order in writing, direct the publisher of the newspaper or news-sheet to deposit as security within twenty-one days from the date of the order, such amount as the Sessions Judge may think fit to require in money or the equivalent thereof in Government securities as the person making the deposit may choose.

Section 8 – Power to forfeit security or demand further security

Whenever upon complaint made to him in writing by the competent authority and inquiry made in the manner hereinafter provided, the Sessions Judge is satisfied–

(a) that any newspaper or news-sheet in respect of which any security has been ordered to be deposited under section 7 or under this section thereafter publishes any objectionable matter, and

(b) that there are sufficient grounds for making an order under this section, the Sessions Judge shall, by order in writing,–

(i) declare such security as has been deposited or any portion thereof to be forfeited to the Government, or

(ii) direct the publisher of the newspaper or news-sheet to deposit within twenty-one days from the date of the order such further security as the Sessions Judge may deem fit to require, and may also, in either case, declare all copies of the newspaper or news-sheet containing such objectionable matter, wherever found in India, to be forfeited to the Government.

Section 9 – Consequences of failure to deposit security as required under section 7 or section 8

(1) Where the publisher of a newspaper is required under section 7, or section 8 to deposit any amount as security and the deposit is not made within the time allowed,

(a) the declaration made by the publisher of the newspaper under section 5 of the Press Registration Act shall be deemed to be annulled; and

(b) notwithstanding anything contained in the Press Registration Act, no person shall make, or be allowed to make, a fresh declaration before a Magistrate under section 5 of that Act as publisher of that newspaper or any other newspaper which is the same in substance as that newspaper, unless he deposits with the Magistrate as security the same amount as was required of the publisher of the newspaper under section 7 or section 8, as the case may be, in money or the equivalent thereof in Government securities as the person making the deposit may choose.

(2) Where a deposit is required from the publisher of a newspaper or news-sheet under section 7 or section 8, no press shall, after the expiry of the time allowed to make the deposit, be used for the printing or publishing of such newspaper or news-sheet, without the permission of the Government, until the deposit has been made.

(3) The keeper of any press who knowingly contravenes the provisions of sub-section (2) shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to one year, or with fine, or with both, and where such keeper is convicted for a second or subsequent contravention under this subsection in respect of the same newspaper or news-sheet, the Court may also direct that the press or any part thereof shall be forfeited to Government:

Provided that the press or part thereof so forfeited shall not be disposed of within a period of three months from the date of the order of forfeiture, and if the keeper of the press deposits the required amount within the aforesaid, period, the press or part thereof, as the case may be, shall be returned to the keeper of the press.

Section 10 – Amount of security

The amount of security, required to be deposited by the keeper of a press or the publisher of any newspaper or news-sheet under section 4 or section 5 or section 7 or section 8, shall be fixed with due regard to the circumstances of the case and shall not be excessive, and shall, in no case, be larger than the amount specified in the complaint under section 16.

Section 11 – Power of Government to declare certain publications forfeited

The State Government may, on the certificate of the Advocate-General the principal law officer, as the ease may be, of the State or of the Attorney-General of India that any issue of a newspaper or news-sheet or any book or other document, wherever made, contains any objectionable matter, by notification in the Official Gazette, stating the grounds for the order, declare that every copy of such issue of the newspaper or news-sheet or of such book or document shall be forfeited to the Government.

Section 12 – Power to detain packages containing certain publications when imported

(1) The chief customs officer or other officer authorised by the State Government in this behalf may detain any package brought whether by land, sea or air into the territories to which this Act extends in which he suspects there are newspapers, news-sheets, books or other documents containing objectionable matter, and shall forthwith forward copies of any newspapers, books or other documents found therein to such officer as the State Government may appoint in this behalf to be disposed of in such manner as the State Government may direct.

(2) Any person aggrieved by any action taken under sub-section (1) may apply to the State Government for review and the State Government may pass such orders thereon as it thinks fit.

Section 13 – Prohibition of transmission by post of certain documents

(1) No newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document which has been declared to be forfeited under any of the provisions of this Act, and no unauthorised newspaper or unauthorised news-sheet shall be transmitted by post.

(2) Any officer in charge of a post office or authorised in this behalf by the Postmaster-General may detain in course of transmission by post any article, other than a letter, which he suspects to contain any such document as is mentioned in sub-section (1), and shall deliver all such articles to such officer as the State Government may appoint in this behalf.

(3) If the officer to whom any article is delivered under sub-section (2) is satisfied that the article contains any such document as is mentioned in sub-section (1), he may pass such orders as to the disposal of the article and its contents as he deems proper, and if he is not so satisfied, he shall return the article to the post office for transmission to the addressee.

Section 14 – Power to seize and destroy unauthorised news-sheets and newspapers

(1) Any police officer or any other person empowered in this behalf by the State Government may seize any unauthorised newspaper or unauthorised news-sheet.

(2) Any Presidency Magistrate. District Magistrate, Sub-divisional Magistrate or Magistrate of the first class may, by warrant authorise any police officer, not below the rank of sub-inspector, to enter upon and search any place where any stock of unauthorised newspapers or news-sheets may be, or may be reasonably suspected to be, and such police officer may seize any document found in such place which in his opinion are unauthorised newspapers or unauthorised news-sheets.

(3) All documents seized under sub-section (1) shall be produced as soon as may be before a Presidency Magistrate, a District Magistrate, a Sub-divisional Magistrate or a Magistrate of the first class and all documents seized under sub-section (2) shall be produced as soon is may be before the Court of the Magistrate who issued the warrant.

(4) If, in the opinion of such Magistrate or Court, any of such documents are unauthorised newspapers or unauthorised news-sheets, the Magistrate or Court may cause them to be destroyed, but if, in the opinion of such Magistrate or Court, any of such documents are not unauthorised newspapers or unauthorised news-sheets, such Magistrate or Court shall dispose of them in the manner provided in sections 523, 524 and 525 of the Code.

Section 15 – Power to seize and forfeit undeclared presses producing unauthorised newspapers and unauthorised news-sheets

(1) Where a Presidency Magistrate, District Magistrate or Sub-divisional Magistrate, has reason to believe that an unauthorised newspaper or unauthorised news-sheet is being produced from an undeclared press within the local limits of his jurisdiction, he may, by warrant, authorise any police officer not below the rank of sub-inspector to enter upon and search any place where such undeclared press may be, or may be reasonably suspected to be, and if in the opinion of such police officer any press found in such place is an undeclared press and is used to produce an unauthorised newspaper or unauthorised news-sheet, he may seize such press and any documents found in the place which in his opinion are unauthorised newspapers or unauthorised news-sheets.

(2) The police officer shall for with make a report of the search to the Court which issued the warrant and shall, produce before such Court as soon as may be all property seized:

Provided that where any press which has been seized cannot be readily removed, the police officer may produce before the Court only such parts thereof as he may think fit.

(3) If such Court after such inquiry as it may deem requisite is of opinion that a press seized under this section is an undeclared press which is used to produce an unauthorised news paper or news-sheet, it may, by order in writing, declare the press or any part thereof to be forfeited to the Government, but if after such inquiry the Court is not of such opinion, it shall dispose of the press in the manner provided in sections 523, 524 and 525 of the Code.

(4) The Court shall deal with the documents produced before it under this section in the manner provided in sub-section (4) of section 14.

Chapter III – PROCEDURE

Section 16 to 22 – INQUIRY BEFORE SESSIONS JUDGES

Section 16 – Contents of complaint

Every complaint to the Sessions Judge under this Act against any person (hereinafter referred to as the respondent) shall state or describe the objectionable matter in respect of which the complaint is made, and where it is desired that security should be demanded from the respondent, shall specify the amount of security which, in the opinion of the State Government, should be so demanded.

Section 17 – Issue of notice

On receipt of a complaint from the competent authority, the Sessions Judge shall issue notice thereof to the respondent calling upon him to appear and show cause on a date to be specified in the notice why such action as may be appropriate in the circumstances of the case should not be taken against him under this Act.

Section 18 – Procedure for inquiries

(1) When the respondent appears before the Sessions Judge in compliance with a notice under section 17, the Sessions Judge shall settle the points for determination and proceed the inquire into the compliant, and after taking such evidence as may be produced and after hearing the parties, pass such orders under this A as he may think fit.

(2) Any inquiry under this Act shall be made, as nearly as may practicable, in the manner prescribed for conducting trials in summons cases by Magistrates under the Code except that evidence shall be recorded in full.

Section 19 – Non-appearance of respondent

If upon the day appointed for the appearance of the respondent or any day subsequent thereto to which the inquiry may be adjourned, the respondent does not appear, the Sessions Judge shall proceed to hear the complaint and take all such evidence, if any, as may be produced in support of the complaint and part such orders under this Act as he may think fit:

Provided that if, on an application made by the respondent with fifteen days of the date of the ex parte order, the Sessions Judge satisfied that there are sufficient grounds, he may set aside the order and make a fresh inquiry into the compliant.

Section 20 – Jury

(1) If in any inquiry before a Sessions Judge under the Act, the respondent claims to have the matter determined with the a of a jury, the provisions hereinafter contained shall apply.

(2) Every such jury shall consist of five persons and shall be chose from the persons summoned to act as such from the list of persons prepared under sub-section (3).

(3) Such officer as may be appointed by the. State Government this behalf shall prepare and make out in alphabetical order a list persons residing within the State who by reason of their journalist experience or of their connection with printing presses or newspapers of their experience in public affairs are qualified to serve as jurors.

(4) The list shall contain the name, the place of residence a occupation of every such person.

(5) In so far as the provisions of parts C, E, E and K of Chapter XXIII of the Code can be made applicable consistently with the provision of this Act, the provisions of the said parts C, E and E shall apply to inquiries under this section, and the provisions of the said part K shall apply to the preparation and revision of lists of jurors under this section.

Section 21 – Conclusion of inquiry made with the aid of a jury

(1) Where in inquiry made with the aid of a jury the Sessions Judge does not this it necessary to express disagreement with the opinion of the jurors or majority of the jurors, he shall pass orders accordingly.

(2) If in any such inquiry the Sessions Judge disagrees with the opinion of the jurors and is of opinion that it is necessary for the ends of justice to submit the case to the High Court, he shall submit the case accordingly recording the grounds for his opinion.

(3) In dealing with the case so submitted, the High Court may exercise any of the powers conferred on a Sessions Judge by this Act.

Section 22 – Admissibility of previous and subsequent issues

In any inquiry before a Sessions Judge with reference to any newspaper or news-sheet, any previous or subsequent issue of such newspaper or news-sheet may be given in evidence in aid of the proof of the nature and effect of the words, signs or visible representations in respect of which the complaint is made.

Section 23 to 25 – Appeal and Application to High Court.

Section 23 – Appeal to High Court against orders of Sessions Judges

Any person against whom an order is passed by a Sessions Judge under section 4, section 5, section 7, or section 8 may, within sixty days of the date of such order, prefer an appeal to the High Court, and upon such appeal, the High Court may pass such orders, as it deems fit confirming, varying or reversing the order appealed from, and may pass such consequential or incidental orders as may be necessary.

Section 24 – Application to High Court against orders of forfeiture

Any person aggrieved by an order of forfeiture passed by the State Government under section 11 or by a Magistrate under sub-section (2) of section 6 or subsection (3) of section 9 or by any order under sub-section (2) of section 12 may, within sixty days of the date of such order, apply to the High Court to set aside such order, and upon such application, the High Court may pass such order as it deems fit confirming, varying or reversing the order of the State Government or the Magistrate, and may pass such consequential or incidental orders as may be necessary.

Section 25 – Procedure in High Court

Every High Court may frame rules to regulate the procedure in respect of cases submitted to it under section 21, appeals under section 23, and applications under section 24, costs in such proceedings and the execution of orders passed therein, and until such rules are framed, the practice of such High Court in proceedings in respect of reference, appeal and revision shall apply, in so far as may be practicable, to such cases, appeals and applications.

Chapter IV – PENALTIES

Section 26 – Penalty for keeping press or publishing newspaper without making deposit

(1) Whoever is the keeper of a press which is used for the printing or publishing of any newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document without making a deposit as required under section 4 or section 5 shall be punishable with fine which may extend to two thousand rupees, or with imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months, or with both.

(2) Whoever publishes any newspaper or news-sheet without making a deposit as required under section 7 or section 8 or publishes such news-paper or news-sheet knowing that such security has not been deposited shall be punishable with fine which may extend to two thousand rupees, or with imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months, or with both.

Section 27 – Penalty for disseminating unauthorised newspapers and unauthorised news-sheets

Whoever sells or distributes or keeps for sale or distribution any unauthorised newspaper or unauthorised news-sheet knowing or having reason to believe that it was an unauthorised newspaper or an unauthorised news-sheet shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months, or with fine, or with both.

Chapter V – MISCELLANEOUS

Section 28 – Service of notices

Every notice under this Act shall be served in the manner provided for the service of summonses under the Code:

Provided that if service in such manner cannot, by the exercise of the diligence, be effected, the serving officer shall, where the notice is directed to the keeper of a press, affix a copy thereof to some conspicuous part of the place where the press is situate, as described in the keeper’s declaration under section 4 of the Press Registration Act, and where the notice is directed to the publisher of a newspaper, to some conspicuous part of the premises where the publication of such newspaper is conducted, as given in the publisher’s declaration under section 5 of that Act, and thereupon the notice shall be deemed to have been duly served.

Section 29 – Issue of search warrants in certain cases

(1) Where any press is, or any copies of any newspaper, news-sheet book or other document are, declared forfeited to Government under this Act, the State Government may direct a Magistrate to issue a warrant empowering any police officer, not below the rank of sub-inspector, to seize and detain any property ordered to be forfeited and to enter upon and search for such property in any premises–

(a) where any such property may be, or may be reasonably suspected to be, or

(b) where any copy of such newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document is kept for sale, distribution, publication or public exhibition or is reasonably suspected to be so kept.

(2) Without prejudice to the provisions contained in sub-section (1), where any newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document is declared forfeited to Government, it shall be lawful for any police officer to seize the same wherever found.

Section 30 – Conduct of searches

Every warrant issued under this Act. shall, so far as it relates to a search, be executed in the manner provided for the execution of search warrants under the Code.

Section 31 – Power to transfer cases

Whenever it appears to the High Court or, as the case may be, the Central Government that the transfer of any particular inquiry under this Act from one Sessions Judge to another will be convenient or will promote the ends of justice, such transfer may be directed–

(a) where both the Sessions Judges are subject to the appellate jurisdiction of a High Court, by that High Court; and

(b) in any other case by the Central Government.

Section 32 – Return of security in certain cases

Where any keeper of a press or publisher of a newspaper or news-sheet has deposited any amount as security or further security as required under section 4 or section 5 or section 7 or section 8 and no further action has been taken in respect of the press or newspaper or news-sheet under this Act for a period of two years from the date of such deposit, the person who made the deposit or any person claiming under him may apply to the Magistrate, within whose jurisdiction such press is situate, or, as the ease may be such newspaper or news-sheet is published, for the return of the security in deposit; and thereupon such security shall, upon proof of the claim of the applicant to the satisfaction of the Magistrate, be returned to such person.

Section 33 – Bar of jurisdiction

Every declaration of forfeiture purporting, to be made under this Act shall, as against all persons, be conclusive evidence that the forfeiture therein referred to has taken place, and no proceeding purporting to be taken under this Act shall be called in question by any Court except the High Court on appeal or application under section 23 or section 24, and no civil or criminal proceeding except as provided by this Act shall be instituted against any person for anything which is in good faith done or intended to be done under this Act.

Section 34 – Bar of double penalty

Notwithstanding anything contained in this Act, no keeper of a press or publisher of any newspaper or news-sheet shall be prosecuted under section 26, if for the same act or omission such person has been proceeded against under section 4 or section 5 or section 7 or section 8 nor shall any such person be proceeded against under section 4 or section 5 or section 7 or section 8, if for the same act or omission such person has been prosecuted under section 26.

Section 35 – Cognizability of offences under this Act

Notwithstanding anything contained in the Code any offence punishable under this Act and any abetment of any such offence shall be cognizable and bailable.

Section 36 – Amendment of sections 4 and 8, Act XXV of 1867

In the Press and Registration of Books Act, 1867,–

(a) in section 4, for the words “the Magistrate” the words “the District, Presidency or Sub-Divisional Magistrate” shall be substituted; and

(b) in section 8, for the words “any Magistrate” the words “any District, Presidency or Sub-Divisional Magistrate” shall be substituted.

Section 37 – Repeals

(1) The Acts specified in the First Schedule are hereby repealed.

(2) Any provision contained in any of the Provincial or State Acts specified in the Second Schedule, in so far as it imposes any restrictions on the printing, publication or distribution of any newspaper, news-sheet, book or other document, whether by providing for the pre-censorship thereof, or for the demand of security from the printer or, publisher, or in any other manner, shall cease to have effect.

THE FIRST SCHEDULE
[See section 37 (2)]
Central Acts

1. The Indian States (Protection against Disaffection) Act, 1922.

2. The Press (Emergency Powers) Act, 1931 (XXIII of 1931).

3. The Foreign Relations Act, 1932 (XII of 1932).

4. “The Indian States (Protection)-Act, 1934 (XV of 1934).

State Acts

1. The Hyderabad Press and Printing Establishment Act (XII of 1357F)

2. The Madhya Bharat Press (Emergency Powers) Act, 1950 (LXIX of 1950).

3. The Mysore Press and Newspapers Act, 1940 (XIV of 1940).

4. The Patiala and East Punjab States Union Press (Emergency Powers) Ordinance, 2006 (XIV of 2006).

5. The Rajasthan Press Control Ordinance, 1949 (XLVI of 1949).

THE SECOND SCHEDULE
[See section 37 (2)]

1. The Assam Maintenance of Public Order Act, 1947 (V of 1917).

2. The Bihar Maintenance of Public Order Act, 1949 (III of 1950).

3. The Bombay Public Security Measures Act, 1947 (VI of 1947).

4. The Madhya Pradesh Public Security Measures Act, 1950 (XXIII of 1950).

5. The Madras Maintenance of Public Order Act, 1949 (XXIII of 1949).

6. The Orissa Maintenance of Public Order Act, 1950 (X of 1950).

7. The West Bengal Security Act, 1950 (XIX of 1950).

8. The United State of Gwalior, Indore and Malwa (Madhya Bharat) Maintenance of Public Order Act, Samvat 2005 (VII of 1949).

9. The Patiala and East Punjab States, Union Public Safety Ordinance, 2006 (VII of 2006).

10. The Rajasthan Public Security Ordinance, 1949 (XXVI of 1949).

11. The Saurashtra Public Safety Measures Ordinance, 1948 (IX of 1948).

12. The Travancore-Cochin Safety Measures Act, 1950 (V of 1950).

13. The Bhopal State Public Safety Act, 1947 (V of 1947).

OFFICE TIMINGS
Monday to Saturday 10:00 am to 06:00 pm.
Sundays and Holidays Reserved for urgent & prior appointments.

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